Edition 1453
09 December 2017
Edition: 1453

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Minho University proud of ‘most quoted Portuguese scientist’ in the world

in Regional · 30-11-2017 13:55:00 · 0 Comments

Portuguese physicist, Nuno Peres, from the University of Minho (UMinho) is the most cited Portuguese scientist in the world, according to the 2017 Highly Cited Researcher’s list by Clarivate Analytics.

In a statement issued at the end of last week, the university said it was very proud of its professor.
The list includes 3,500 scientists from all over the world, among them nine Portuguese, with Nuno Peres’ articles being cited over 21,684 times in the last 20 years, with each article being cited on average 278 times.
The university said the presence of national researchers on this list is highly relevant since it is an indicator of the quality and international impact of science ‘made in Portugal’.
Clarivate Analytics’ ‘Highly Cited Researchers’ is produced annually by Clarivate Analytics, which acquired the Web of Science and Thomson Reuters databases, and focuses only on the highly cited articles, which represent 1% of what is published worldwide.
Nuno Peres is professor and vice-president of UMinho’s School of Sciences and since 2004 is the first Portuguese physicist to devote himself to the investigation of graphene, the two-dimensional shape of carbon with potential applications in electronics, photonics, composite materials, in sensors and in the life sciences.
In addition to Nuno Peres, the other Portuguese scientists who are part of the ranking are Miguel Araújo (University of Évora) with 20,558 citations and Mário Figueiredo (University of Lisbon) with 8,348 citations.

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Edition 1453
09 December 2017
Edition: 1453

Read this week's issue online exactly as it appears in print.

Twitter