Edition 1446
21 October 2017
Edition: 1446

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Portugal approves economic internationalisation plan by end of year

by TPN/ Lusa, in Business · 28-09-2017 14:58:00 · 0 Comments

The Portuguese government plans to approve an economic internationalisation plan by the end of the year, in October it will gather contributions from business associations and intends to put the plan into practice at the beginning of 2018, the secretary of state for internationalisation said.

This schedule was presented to journalists by Secretary of State, Eurico Brilhante Dias, at the end of a meeting of the Strategic Council for the Internationalisation of the Portuguese Economy, chaired by Prime Minister António Costa.
According to Brilhante Dias, during the meeting, which lasted about two and a half hours, the Government presented a working document on the “Internationalisation Programme” to the business associations, which aims to bring the private and public sectors together to increase domestic exports and attract foreign direct investment.
“The basic document presented had a very favourable reception by the business associations. We are now entering a second phase in which, in October, business associations will contribute to improve the document,” said the Secretary of State for
Internationalisation.
The final version of the “Internationalisation Programme” will be taken to the Council of Ministers for approval by the end of this year, he said.
“We hope to start 2018 with a new instrument, in order to provide a qualitative leap in terms of how the country is perceived abroad and how it is organised in terms of attracting investment,” said the Secretary of State.

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Edition 1446
21 October 2017
Edition: 1446

Read this week's issue online exactly as it appears in print.

Twitter