Edition 1453
09 December 2017
Edition: 1453

Read this week's issue online exactly as it appears in print.

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Vegetarian options in all public canteens from June

in News · 20-04-2017 15:53:00 · 0 Comments

From June, all public canteens and refectories in Portugal will be compelled to offer at least one vegetarian option on their menus, following a directive published in the Government Gazette at the start of this week.

Vegetarian options in all public canteens from June

Under the new law, published on Monday and which comes into effect in June, the rule applies to all public service canteens, such as those in national health service centres and hospitals, primary and secondary schools, universities, prisons and education centres, and social service units.
To avoid food waste, the law states that schools and health units can opt out of the option if there is no demand for it.
Should demand be low, those who manage the canteens can establish a pre-order regime for vegetarian meals.
“The vegetarian menus are created under the guidance of qualified technicians and take into account the composition of the meal, ensuring their diversity and the availability of nutrients that provide a healthy diet”, the bill explains.
National health and safety watchdog, Deco, is responsible for inspecting whether the new law is being upheld.
The bill further defines a period of transition, that can go up to six months, for the management entities that administer the canteens or cafeterias
directly.
“In other cases, when contracts for the supply of meals are still in effect on the date that the law comes into force, the supplier is not obliged to provide vegetarian meal and the respective management entity is exempt from providing this option until the end of the period of the contract”, it adds.
The law that establishes the obligation to offer at least one vegetarian meal option in public canteens and refectories was approved last month in Parliament.
According to the Directorate General of Health (DGS), vegetarian diets have important benefits, such as reducing the prevalence of cancer disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia (blood fats), hypertension and diabetes.

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Edition 1453
09 December 2017
Edition: 1453

Read this week's issue online exactly as it appears in print.

Twitter