Portugal beating the UK in the battle of the shopping basket

By Kim Schiffmann, in News · 09-08-2019 01:00:00 · 0 Comments
Portugal beating the UK in the battle of the shopping basket

A recent study by Compare My Mobile has uncovered the cheapest and most expensive places to buy the most popular weekly food shop items across Europe.

The study revealed that on average a shopping basket full of the most common food items costs €65.42 per week in the UK, but if the same items were purchased in Portugal it would cost €47.74; equating to monthly savings of €76 and a staggering €900 per year for Portuguese shoppers.””Switzerland, with €141.06, is the most expensive country for weekly shops. Comparing this to Portugal (€47.74 a week), people residing in Switzerland are paying on average €4,852.55 more a year on the same items. France, with €79.70 a week, is more expensive than Italy (€70.55) and Germany (€63.29). Turkey is one of the cheapest countries to live in with €34.22 being the average weekly shopping cost.


The study also uncovered that of all the countries in the study, Cyprus is on average the most expensive place to buy 1 litre of milk costing €1.40 which was followed by Switzerland, Italy and the UK; In Portugal the average cost of milk is €0.65.


Further findings revealed that of the countries, the most expensive place for coffee lovers is Switzerland which costs on average 28.14 per week compared to the UK, but the Portuguese can get their daily caffeine fix for €8.40 per week, a saving of €19.74...which could buy 4 extra coffees in Switzerland.


Overall, of all countries analysed the most expensive country worldwide for the weekly shop compared to the UK is Switzerland costing €141.23, the cheapest is Georgia costing €23.49.

Read the full report here: https://www.comparemymobile.com/features/worldwide-grocery-comparison/



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